LESSON PLAN EXAMPLE
PINGREE SCHOOL
COLLABORATIVE DRAWING
GENERAL INFORMATION

TEACHER NAME: Healey

GRADE: Mix of 10/11/12 graders – Drawing Class

LENGTH OF LESSON: 3-4 periods, 60min each

RELATIONSHIP TO UNIT

UNIT: Introduction to Drawing with Charcoal

           This lesson offers students the opportunity to practice identifying and                                       reproducing line, relationships between forms, and full and correct grayscale value                 using an exemplar image.

RELATIONSHIP TO LIFE

INSTRUCTIONAL IMPORTANCE: 

This lesson serves as a bridge between the skills learned from previous contour/value studies and an original charcoal drawing. Visually, the lesson gives student artists’ the ability to see a full composition broken down into its most crucial and individual parts. The process will offer insights into the students’ art making processes, specifically into how individual pieces of value or shapes, when put together, make up a larger form. 

 

HOW DOES THIS LESSON ADDRESS THE DEVELOPMENTAL LEVEL OF GRADE LEVEL: 

Learning how to give a drawing dimension requires a fine tuned understanding of tone and value. Building on the traditional grayscale, this lesson gives students the time and space to master the ability to identify specific values, texture and shapes and practice techniques in order to reproduce the same value using a given material. Moving forward, greater control over the media (charcoal) and the concept of value will allow students to approach drawing from direct observation with a nuanced understanding of shape, line, tone, and dimension. 

ACTIVITY STATEMENT

Using the aid of an assigned exemplar, students are challenged with understanding a black and white image through a full and complete grayscale by isolating, identifying, and reproducing tone and shape using charcoal on gridded paper. Students then work together to arrange their individual drawings into a larger, complete composition.

GOALS

BY THE END OF THE LESSON STUDENTS SHOULD UNDERSTAND: 

How the breakdown of value into simple shapes will build on each other and blend into a full value composition when viewed at a distance. (MCFA; F.V.Cr.03)

 

BY THE END OF THE LESSON STUDENTS SHOULD KNOW: 

How to Identify and produce value using various charcoals, charcoal tools, and application techniques  (MCFA; F.V.Cr.03)

 

BY THE END OF THE LESSON STUDENTS SHOULD BE ABLE TO: 

Reflect on the scaffolded process of drawing what they see and demonstrate their understanding in their next portrait project. (MCFA; P.VCr.03)

BY THE END OF THE LESSON STUDENTS SHOULD BE ABLE TO DEMONSTRATE: 

Knowledge and mastery of value and tone through a final composition 

 

BY THE END OF THE LESSON STUDENTS SHOULD BE ABLE TO ANALYZE: 

A full and complete value scale and be able to separate values in order to replicate their exemplar

 

BY THE END OF THE LESSON STUDENTS SHOULD BE ABLE TO IDENTIFY: 

A full and correct value scale and be able to demonstrate an understanding of an expanding array of gray tone using charcoal. 

 

BY THE END OF THE LESSON STUDENTS SHOULD BE ABLE TO USE: 

Line, pressure, transfer and other charcoal application techniques in order to recreate their exemplar as well as use different types of charcoal appropriately. 

OBJECTIVES

FORMAL CONCEPTS: 

  • Form can be identified through the use of value

  • Tone can be changed through application

  • Highlights can be achieved through subtractive drawing techniques 

  • Shadows can be achieved through additive drawing techniques 

  • Perspective can change perception

 

ARTISTIC BEHAVIORS:  

  • Working from the grid allows students to focus on value and shape relationships

  • Actively moving and changing drawing perspectives will inform the final composition

  • Practicing value separation and identification will strengthen skills in drawing from direct observation 

INSTRUCTIONAL
CONCEPTS

MATERIALS: 

  • 5”x5” Print-out of exemplar

  • 10”x10” charcoal paper

  • Charcoal - vine and compressed, charcoal pencil

  • Q-tips, blending stumps

  • Kneadable, rubber and vinyl eraser

  • Ruler

  • Mechanical pencil

  • Paper towels

 

EXEMPLARS:  

RESOURCES 
AND MATERIALS

Teacher will have prepared an example of a final product disassembled. Students will observe the individual drawings from a close proximity where they are unable to identify the subject of the drawing. Teacher will attach the individual drawings to a far wall where the image will be “revealed” to the students as the puzzle is put together.

MOTIVATION

DEMONSTRATION: 

  • Teacher will project a slide show of past student examples.

  • Class will discuss what they found interesting about the process and what they responded to in regards to the process

  • Teacher will show and discuss an example of a gridded drawing and gridded exemplar and discuss the process/expectations of how to begin

  • Students will receive their random “puzzle pieces”. Students will not know the subject of the portrait until the construction phase.

 

DISTRIBUTION: 

  • Students collect their paper, ruler and pencil from the supply shelves. 

  • When ready, students will collect charcoal, erasers and blending tools from the supply shelf. 

 

WORK PERIOD: 

  • Teacher will demonstrate how to divide the 10x10 inch paper into a 2 inch grid, and the exemplar into a 1 inch grid

  • While students are completing the task of gridding the paper and exemplar independently,  the teacher circles the classroom to be available for questions.

  • Students move from block to block on the grid reproducing the same value as the corresponding grid square from their exemplar printout. 

 

CLEAN-UP: 

  • Students will return all materials to the correct place on the supply shelves

  • Students will paperclip their exemplar to their drawing and store the drawing in their class flat file. 

  • Students wash their hands and tables free of charcoal. 

 

CLOSURE: 

  • Teacher will check in with the class before clean-up begins to talk about expectations and action plans for the next class. 

PROCEDURES

CRITERIA: 

  • Teacher will observe student progress informally by moving around the classroom and checking in with each student individually

  • Teacher will note students reception and implementation of feedback

  • Teacher will note students' adherence to deadlines

EVALUATION

Massachusetts Department of Education (2019). Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks for Arts. (MCFA Standard No. F.V.Cr.03). https://www.doe.mass.edu/frameworks/current.html

 

Massachusetts Department of Education (2019). Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks for Arts. (MCFA Standard No. P.V.Cr.03). https://www.doe.mass.edu/frameworks/current.html

REFERENCES